Australia in huge slip down global broadband rankings

187


news Australia has taken a substantial leap down the table of countries globally with good broadband, with the nation’s poor average peak connection speeds seeing it slip 14 spots in just the past six months by one measurement, and other benchmarks also slipping slightly.

The ‘State of the Internet’ report is produced by online content delivery specialist Akamai Technologies every quarter. It is regarded as one of the benchmark standards by which countries and organisations measure broadband speeds globally. Akamai is in a good position to measure global Internet speeds due to its extensive global content delivery network sitting at the heart of networks in each country.

In the company’s latest report — measuring broadband speeds over the past three months, Akamai noted that Australia had slipped down 14 spots on the global table in that quarter in terms of average broadband connection speeds.

Australia is now ranked 60th globally when it comes to average broadband speeds. This places the nation behind a number of other competing countries in the Asia-Pacific region — not only behind fibre-rich countries such as South Korea, Hong Kong and Japan, but also behind financial and trading hub Singapore, as well as Taiwan, Thailand and New Zealand.

Australia is now fast approaching less-developed countries such as Sri Lanka, Vietnam and the Philippines in terms of our peak connection speed ranking. Australia’s peak average broadband speed is now 39.3Mbps, a figure which actually slipped down 6.3 percent from the previous quarter.

Australia also took slight steps downwards in terms of other benchmarks such as percentage ranking of countries that have broadband speeds faster than 4Mbps (we slipped from 52nd to 56th), countries that have broadband speeds faster than 10Mbps (we slipped from 45th to 47th) and also the country ranking in terms of average connection speeds (we slipped from 46th to 48th).

Shadow Communications Minister Jason Clare said the move represented Australia having “crashed” in the global broadband rankings again.

“Less than three years ago when Malcolm Turnbull changed course on the National Broadband Network Australia was ranked 30th in the world for average peak connection speed,” Clare said. “Today we are ranked 60th.”
 
“Australia’s broadband ranking crashed 14 spots last quarter alone. We are behind most of Asia and most of Europe, the US and Canada. We are even behind Romania, Russia, Slovakia and Poland.”

Clare chalked up Australia’s slide to what he described as “Malcolm Turnbull’s second-rate copper NBN”, which he said was causing Australia’s broadband competitive to crash against “every broadband metric that has a measure”.
 
“Australian businesses need reliable, fast broadband to compete in the global digital economy, but Malcolm Turnbull is shackling Australia to an NBN that relies on last century’s copper,” said Clare. “Malcolm Turnbull’s second rate NBN is a complete failure.”
 
“Malcolm Turnbull promised that his second rate NBN would reach every home in 2016 – he has doubled that timeframe. He also promised his second rate NBN would cost $29.5 billion – he has nearly doubled the cost to up to $56 billion.”
 
“And now we have doubled our world ranking for internet speeds – from 30th in the world to 60th. Malcolm Turnbull has made a mess of the NBN. Australia cannot afford another three years of Malcolm Turnbull’s failures.”

opinion/analysis
I wrote the following in September last year about a similar Akamai report released at the time, and things (unfortunately) don’t appear to have changed much since that time:

“What we are seeing here is very clear.

On the one hand, Australia is indeed increasing its broadband speeds across the board. On most measures, as a country Australians are generally getting access to better broadband, and we’re seeing this in the stats.

However, balancing this fact appears to be two factors. Firstly, Australia’s broadband penetration is still increasing, so the added numbers of people joining the broadband revolution appears to be keeping our average speeds from jumping up too far.

In addition, Australia is just not deploying high enough speed infrastructure at a fast enough rate. The ten years which Australia’s politicians spent debating how and why Australia’s broadband infrastructure should be upgraded is finally catching up with us as a country. In that time, most other first-world countries incentivised their incumbent telcos to conduct major upgrades.

Australia took far too long to get on the bandwagon, due to factors such as the lack of bipartisanship on the issue and the reluctance of Telstra’s previous management under Sol Trujillo to play ball.

As a result, the rate at which Australia is increasing its broadband speeds is slower than the rate at which the rest of the world is increasing its broadband speeds. So even though things are slowly getting better in Australia as initiatives such as the National Broadband Network gain pace, we’re still slipping further behind compared to the rest of the world.

As many people have written continuously over the past few years, the only way to stop our trend downwards is to deploy Fibre to the Premises infrastructue, and price access to it at a level that will allow Australians to access higher speeds. We’re not going to leap in the rankings by only upgrading our copper networks and focusing on 25Mbps speeds. Most other first-world countries are 5-10 years ahead of Australia in doing that.”

187 COMMENTS

  1. Luckily Australia doesn’t need fast inter-ma-nets so we can hit rock bottom and we won’t even notice it.

  2. But the CBA told us we will only need 15Mbit in 2025, obviously they know more than any of those silly internet analysts or professionals.

    • It wasn’t the CBA, it was a report by Communications Chamber. Spoken to the guy on Twitter about a few things in his report. He admits he got them wrong, but didn’t know much about the technology he was working out the bandwidth of in his report. He got data from someone on video bandwidth requirements and interpolated the other applications from there. He assumed VR was just video sent to you similar to a 3D movie. I’d like to have him spend an hour wearing a VR headset using video streamed to him via the network and see how many minutes it is before he starts losing his stomach contents.

        • Thanks Jason, I didn’t think I was imagining things.

          I did get the year wrong… 2023 instead of 2025… Oh dear. I hope Reality doesn’t pick up on it, it’ll be his next go to insult to use against me.

        • It’s true that the average small household would be decently served by an average of 15 Mbps, but they are talking peak speeds. Just won’t cut it. From personal experience, at 13Mbps (ADSL speed measured by speedtest), two people can’t watch HD video at the same time without annoying buffering.

          • Enable QoS and you’ll discover you can manage far more applications without buffering.
            Ironically even when someone gets their fancy 100mb connection they may still have issues with multiple users if they dont have a good router to load balance etc.

  3. I used to say that we would regret what MTM has done to our country in the future.

    It’s plain to see that the regret has already started.

    There WILL be a day when the guilty will be held accountable for their actions!

  4. I would be interested to see how we stand for the cost of our slow connections to the cost of those rated faster than us. I wouldn’t mind betting its a similar story, we pay more or about the same for a poorer service.

    • Well we currently have if not the highest one of the highest internet access cost in the world already and that’s just with ADSL service.

      • I pay 4300 Yen a month for unlimited FTTH in Japan. 200Mbit down, 120Mbit up. It’s great. :)

        That’s about $50AUD a month.

        • Well I could always do a devoid an compare Singapore $50 1Gbps vs our current mess which Turnbull did claim was going to be more affordable

        • Or 2500/2500 Mbps unlimited with US Internet for $99/month
          And we are working on 1/100 of that for close to the same amount…

          10Gbps synchronous is now $298 for unlimited…

        • Comparing Australian internet costs with Asian countries like Japan and America is a bad comparison as the data shows that the vast majority of their content is obtained and hosted from within their country.

          Comparing them to us, when the vast of majority of the content we consume is hosted overseas drastically changes the associated delivery costs to ISPs.

          That said I’m not saying I don’t want cheaper Internet. =)

          • While I agree with you in principle, Japanese internet habits are changing, with the introduction of things like Netflix and Hulu to Japan, the content is hosted overseas even for the Japanese market.

            The difference being in Japans case, they actually have a regulated monopoly of the infrastructure, that doesn’t price gouge the absolute living crap out of their wholesale customers.

          • @Curtis…that sounds like a logical argument, until you look at Singapore who also get the vast majority of their internet through overseas cables and not local servers.

            1000/1000 = $69.90/month unlimited.
            Plan includes:
            Wireless Dual-band Router
            4G Mobile Broadband Plan (500MB)
            Home Digital Line with free unlimited local calls

            10Gbps synchronous unlimited is $189/month

        • I have bog std 100/100Mbit NTT fiber in Japan (that I set up for in laws), unlimited of course, and that is 3810yen/month. $45AUD/Month

          This is different to fiber Au in that Japan fiber does not slow to a crawl in peak times like my current 100/40Mbit fiber that sucks between about 6-12pm.

          • Don’t say that about FTTP here, it causes ‘mass blinking’ in the FTTP cheer squad. 😀

          • @theslydog
            This will assuredly improve as ISPs figure out the provisioning mix and backhaul is increased…
            Japan is a much more mature FTTP rollout.
            Imagine how ugly those poor sods on FTTN are going to get over time…no hope of help.

          • We are referring to FTTP not FTTN, a product released in 2010 (earlier if you count non NBN FTTP rollouts), in 2016 how much more ‘mature’ do you want it to get?

          • “a product released in 2010”

            First commercial rollout for NBN FTTP was the end of 2011. In fact, the first Emerson POI was delivered at the end of the first quarter of 2012 (March 22 to be specific), and the Telstra agreement was finished being signed off by shareholders until Oct 18 2011.
            I have no idea what you are talking about…you seem to keep inventing new histories for almost everything.

            I suppose your views do require their own version of facts…

          • I suppose your views do require their own version of facts…

            He is notorious for doing this. If you have time check out some of the articles from 2013 and earlier it will give some insight into the irrational behavior you are now seeing from him.

          • Yeah devoid gets upset if you used figures for MTM starting at the end of 2013 even though FTTN officially started last year lol

          • Chas,

            First commercial rollout for NBN FTTP was the end of 2011.

            I didn’t say commercial rollout, I said product release, the Tasmanian first product release sites was in 2010.

            you seem to keep inventing new histories for almost everything.

            But you inventing what I said and adding your own agenda is ok?

            You also ignored what I said about FTTP releases before the NBN from the likes of Telstra and Opticomm, but you needed to leave that out because it didn’t suit your counter which you fabricated in the first place.

            I suppose your views do require their own version of facts…

            As distinct from you making up facts or ignoring the facts you don’t like?

          • “I didn’t say commercial rollout, I said product release, the Tasmanian first product release sites was in 2010”

            Not sure what you are talking about…by that measurement, FTTN has been going since 2013 when they started the first trials.
            You could not buy NBN FTTP in 2010 if that is what you are insinuating…

            “You also ignored what I said about FTTP releases before the NBN from the likes of Telstra and Opticomm”

            Again, what you are saying makes no sense at all. We were talking about the maturity of the NBN’s FTTP and the RSPs ability to get the mix right. What does any of what you are blathering have to do with that? I think you should be nicknamed “Alternate” from here on out…because an alternate reality seems to be the only place where what your saying could make sense.

          • Chas,

            You could not buy NBN FTTP in 2010 if that is what you are insinuating…

            Except where you could you mean?

            “Not only is the NBN in Tasmania providing people in three communities with the first taste of the NBN, it is giving retail service providers the opportunity to prove the integration of their services onto the new network. They are also gaining valuable experience in the types of service plans that are attractive to customers using the impressive capabilities of the new network,” Mr Campbell said

            The NBN in Tasmania is currently operating in the communities of Midway Point, Smithton and Scottsdale. The Telstra announcement brings to five the number of RSPs who have signed up to the NBN, the others being iiNet, Primus, Internode and Exetel.

            http://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-releases/nbn-co-welcomes-telstra-to-tasmanian-network.html

            You do understand the meaning of currently operating in the communities of Midway Point, Smithton and Scottsdale?

            Again, what you are saying makes no sense at all. We were talking about the maturity of the NBN’s FTTP and the RSPs ability to get the mix right.

            Yes, and they need to get the mix right no matter who has rolled out the FTTP infrastructure, the fact that FTTP rollouts from other suppliers in Australia pre dates the NBN rollout means RSP’s have had plenty of time to get the mix right.

          • “Except where you could you mean?”

            Nope…please go find out what they paid for that. They were connected for free as part of the trial. In fact the POIs weren’t even delivered until May 2012, so how could that possibly be part of the mix that RSPs must now get right???

            It’s like saying that since ADSL is part of the FTTN design, we’ve had it already for 16+ years…

  5. This is old news, a decade old. We are no longer a 1st world country but a 2nd world country. Wake up.
    I wrote about the state of our broadband and made presentations in about 2002.

  6. And to think that the plutocrats and fat cats still praise Johnny Howard for the Telstra privatisation that led to all this nightmare. Whatever the most backward, non-tech planet of Star Wars was, we have become it.

  7. Has anyone bothered to ask Henry Ergas and/or his mentally challenged mates for comment???

    • I assume you would include Arthur Lowery in this group. A complete imbecile. Thinks the roll out should be even slower because “It keeps people in work”. That is just one of many gems from the March 4 Senate Committee.

  8. Not surprising. GimpCo piss farting around for the last two years with their clown fingers stuck up their clown asses when they should have been concentrating on the original proper plan rolling out fibre so this is the inevitable result. Blame lies totally with the coalition clowns would couldn’t help themselves. Wasn’t enough to slam the brakes on the FttP rollout they wanted to go backwards with their politically motivated FttN garbage (281 days to go btw)

    • Agreed, the loss of momentum was the critical error. Keep it going and we would have had more. The aim was always more connections, but that was forgotten for two and a half years. That was a major failure, no matter who was responsible.

      The uncertainty alone from a change of policy was a selfish move from the Libs.

        • More b.s. From our resident LibTroll, there was a clear ramp up that flat lined around the 2013 election!

          • DO,

            there was a clear ramp up that flat lined around the 2013 election!

            FTTP rollout targets drastically cut by 50% from original estimates at the end in 2013 is a clear indication of a ramp down!

            I know where the BS is.

          • Well devoid the word is “revised” you are looking for becuase you like to using for claiming a target of complete by 2016 to less than 25% of that target of only 2.5M by 2016

          • lol

            The tap dancing look this way look this way diversion.

            Double act as well!

            Those targets quoted have been revised ages ago, and you know that, quoting correctly is not the MtM bashers way of doing things.

          • Well devoid which is better being 50% behind or more than 75% behind.

            But from you complete trying to deflect instead of answering the question.

          • “FTTP rollout targets drastically cut by 50% from original estimates at the end in 2013 is a clear indication of a ramp down!”

            I see…so the fact that they were cut by folks who had a completely vested interest in making FTTP look as bad as possible could not have possibly skewed things…riiiiiiight.
            I’m sure you DO know where the BS is, a distinct byproduct of keeping it so close.

          • Chas,

            I see…so the fact that they were cut by folks who had a completely vested interest in making FTTP look as bad as possible

            huh? the Labor NBN Co wanted their own FTTP rollout to look bad?

            If you say so, in that case it worked. lol

        • @ alain

          “Those targets quoted have been revised ages ago, and you know that…”

          “Hey I will build you a house on a 12 month contract, when it’s not finished in month 12 and you say WTF, I can just say I have extended it another 12 months so it’s still on schedule, then at the end of that 12 months I’ll extend it again and say it’s still on schedule. Easy eh?”

          No need to respond.

          You’re welcome.

          • You tell me alain…

            After all that was a copy/paste of YOUR comment from 2011… when the last mob revised and it was not on according to you.

            But of course now, it’s quite ok…

            That’s truly delicious.

            You’re welcome.

          • Err still waiting alain… can you clarify please?

            Oh no you can’t I thought not.

            Yet again being between that rock and hard place, the standard detour signs, moving goal posts, screaming poor me/personal attack and even out and out lying can’t save you…

            So yes, this is one of those many, many moments where you can’t even conjure up a moronic, childish comeback… so you disappear.

            Yes, I have seen this before “plenty of times”.

            However, I do have to at least, give you credit over and above those like good ol’ “I could have been commissioned to write MTM – ego/narcissist boy”… unlike him, you don’t (simply because you can’t) deny your stupid contradictory comments from the past and if you ridiculously did so, like him, you could eagerly await them to be posted (and then still deny…again if you were him… WTF?)

            Anyhoo.. your absence every time I rekindle your contradictory stupidity, is delicious nonetheless…thank you…

            You’re welcome

  9. Australia’s precipitate slippage down the broadband ranking is the predicted and inevitable consequence of Labor’s decision to prioritise “high speed” rather than “national” with the NBN. From the start its first priority should have been getting a broadband connection in every household, starting with the areas that had no or poor broadband infrastructure, and by doing what google did in the US of making whatever deal was necessary to get everyone signed us as they went through every area. Instead speed was prioritised, making it technically difficult and pushing the construction costs up making it politically difficult to justify and likely to be abandoned as the budget went further in deficit, slowing down the rollout, and pushing the cost to customers too high, meaning it was exactly the people who would benefit from broadband who will never be able to afford it.

    And no, I’m not saying it should never have been fibre. But letting the “experts” make stupid expensive decisions that only the best would do, like three fibres to every home, and NTUs that supported four separate ISPs, etc, etc, were the problem. It was the sort of design you get from the enterprise end of the market, not the consumer end, pointlessly over-specified with heaps of unnecessary features that pushed the price up. And it was the poor marketing inherent in an essentially random rollout instead of one that targeted the areas where it was needed first where the takeup rate would be highest, and therefore the initial flow of income would be highest reducing the need for expensive borrowings.

    • Firstly I don’t argue about areas that need it first. But the problem is you would then have to run a link straight to those areas instead of build out as you go. Head towards the ones that need it first would have been better. Not overbuild areas that already have FTTN/FTTB and HFC that the current mess is doing now.

      Labor decision from the panel because the telco who own the copper wasn’t going to do anything. Plus there would be any over build from Telstra since it did claim it would do Start to do FTTP if they started doing FTTN. There is nothing quick building a network from scratch that why using a premise pass isn’t a good metre of the total rollout.

      Speed of the current mob of only upto 25Mbps as they are taking just as long and costing as much to rollout

    • Blame the last mob… how original Gordon.

      Why didn’t we think of that?

      Of course MTM is the complete fuck up it is because those who came before them and actually set the platform, backhaul etc, to ensure smooth sailing for the new guys… had absolutely SFA to do with this MTM/FRAUDBAND/Nodafail™ fuck-up and subsequent freefall down the broadband ladder.

      So brilliant deduction *shrugs*

      Funny though, you are here saying FttP should have been rolled out to needy area’s first and your (otherwise) likeminded mates are saying the complete opposite, it should have been rolled out in the profitable areas first to lock in profits…

      So you see Gordon, damned if you do/don’t, when dealing with those who have no NFI..

      Which then clearly explains… why those with NFI say… err, umm, ok it’s the last mobs fault…

      • So you see Gordon, damned if you do/don’t, when dealing with those who have no NFI

        Indeed Rizz. There was no right way to roll FttP out. Prioritize poorly served areas people will complain that they should have prioritise more lucrative areas first. Prioritise more lucrative areas first and people will complain about the poorly served areas.

        I wouldn’t pay much attention to what commentators like gordum say though, ill-informed opinions such as this don’t add much to the debate and the poor attempts to revise history are not any better.

        • ill-informed opinions such as this don’t add much to the debate and the poor attempts to revise history are not any better.

          You are being a bit harsh to yourself and Rizz there.

    • So,
      – rollout to those in need first to help those, or
      – rollout to lucrative areas first (that are possibly well served already), or
      – rollout in electorates where the government has lots of support, or
      – rollout in electorates where the government has marginal support, or
      – rollout where there will be significant experience gained due to how those suburbs are laid out, or
      – some mish mash of all of the above.

      What is “right” will also be “wrong” for everyone that wasn’t provisioned early in the rollout. It’s a lose-lose situation so bleating about it doesn’t help.

    • “three fibres to every home, and NTUs that supported four separate ISPs, etc, etc, were the problem. It was the sort of design you get from the enterprise end of the market, not the consumer end, pointlessly over-specified with heaps of unnecessary features that pushed the price up.”

      Agreed about the excessive equipment, it was very wasteful and a failure. One fibre port is abundantly plenty and ditch the phone ports altogether. Simon Hackett discussed this in one of his presentations. It also aggravated the rollout’s vulnerability to criticism. But see other replies about prioritising areas.

      • The stripped down fibre NTDs Telstra use are identical hardware, albeit with less ‘addons’. The difference in price between core NTDs and NTDs with options as has been provided is negligible and provided businesses and high end users the opportunity to pay back more than their fair share to NBN Co.

        In other words, as with the rest of the rollout, the NTD upgrade paid for itself.

    • “like three fibres to every home, and NTUs that supported four separate ISPs, etc, etc, were the problem”

      Huh? that saved money all around…as did the redundancy of the network design. Have you ever tried to design a network to last for 60 years, minimize failure, and allow for future expansion without continually sending a truck out to fix things? It is a brilliant design and VERY economical!

    • Number of fibres to a premise and the NTU were not a huge cost in the scheme of the project. Also the NTU that supported 4 connections, meant that a company could offer an end to end service without the need to have an ISP ie, a pensioner who didn’t want the internet, but had home monitoring installed and a phone service. The home monitoring would be done over the “Internet” however the person would have no need for other services. It also meant none of this nonsense about needing available bandwidth etc.
      The price was to provide ubiquitous network to 93% of Australia. The benefit being no one would have to worry about bandwidth, because if they needed more, they call up and pay for it. Now its a matter of depending on where you live what you have and how good or bad it is. see a service you want, well you may not be able to get it, or if you do get it, the rest of the family might not be able to use the connection.
      The NBN became a political football, a rather weird one given how popular the policy was with voters including of the NBN is not that big, even if the government only made half the money back its hard to say it was not a good investment in the country. We spend and waste so much money elsewhere, a lot of which is coming out of the woodwork now because people are sick of the policies the political parties are trying to say are necessary, while wasting billions elsewhere on their own agendas and mates in the corporate world.
      I wonder how worried they are about this ranking table vs say the University rankings, which apparently we need to do better at thus need to charge more for University. The current NBN solution only would have made sense 10 years ago. It makes less sense given what we were building. Its a sad state of politics in this country that prevents infrastructure from being built. That is where governments should be spending money, not on welfare for the middle class and concessions for the wealthy so they don’t do a dummy spit.

  10. It may be just incompetence or bloody-mindedness, but there is another possibility for why we have poor Internet. Just think of the last 10 years around the world, with oppressive governments being overthrown in revolutions organised over the Internet. Could Tony Abbott have been thinking that by crippling the Internet, he may have been able to suppress opposition to his oppressive regime? Something to think about ;-)

  11. How do we rank on upload speeds? I would assume far worse than 60th given our asymmetric systems.

  12. I’d be interested to see what the median figures for download speeds was.

    Considering ADSL is still the dominant interet access technology in Australia an average of 39Mbs is not realistic.

    Median figure, or even better if they could split their sample into 20% ranges and let us know the speed range each band actually gets.

  13. One one hand this is appalling – but while the Australia Government is focused on delivering more 18th Century energy there cannot be an appreciation of network infrastructure opportunities such as the export of power and information.

  14. Akamai runs some of the worst servers/caches on the planet. Their assessment will always be rather dubious. And to make matters worse the deployment of caches is very rapidly decreasing. Only rather backward organizations such as News Ltd make use of Akamai. Therefore Akamai’s measurements are made from a rather limited perspective.

    • A realistic perspective from Akamai themselves.

      Australia’s average and peak internet speeds have increased by 11 per cent and 6.4 per cent year-on-year, respectively.

      Sure, we dropped down in rankings this quarter, but anomalies in quarterly results aren’t uncommon, according to Akamai senior director for industry and data intelligence, David Belson, who authored the report.

      “The year-on-year measurement gives a better perspective as to what’s going on, and long-term trend,” he told Lifehacker Australia.

      “We do see quarterly declines at times for a variety of reasons, but looking at the country overall, Australia has seen strong increases in speeds; it’s not massive, but still positive.”

      The connection speeds are sufficient for the average user who wants to stream videos, surf the web and play online games, Belson said.

      http://www.theage.com.au/technology/innovation/a-nonsensationalist-look-at-australian-internet-speeds-20160325-gnr0p7.html

      • “Australia has seen strong increases in speeds; it’s not massive, but still positive”

        Again, ignoring the elephant in the room…
        As absolutely everyone has said, Australians average speed has certainly grown compared to itself…but compared to the rest of the world it keeps dropping. THAT is the key issue and it is damnably important!

        He also said “For the most part, business connections speeds are less of an issue. For metropolitan areas like Sydney, you have access to multiple providers and high-speed connections; it’s just a matter of paying for it.”

        I’m not sure if he’s ever read the definition of “inflation”, but creating new expenses for business to absorb (and then pass on to us) is certainly a key contributor.

  15. I saw a good graphic the other day:

    1983: Fraser/LNP hands over economy to ALP ranked 20th in the world
    1996: Keating/ALP hands over economy to LNP ranked 6th in the world
    2007: Howard/LNP hands over economy to ALP ranked 10th in the world
    2013: Rudd/ALP hands over economy to LNP ranked 1st in the world
    Today: LNP dragged economy down to 10th in the world and and dead last in the OECD

    and it seems that instead of taking us to world leaders in national broadband performance and availability, the LNP have dragged us down from 30th to 60th world wide!!!

    So it’s clear, under LNP policies Australia goes backwards in pretty much every major area – Green investment is another item in the list showing the libs pattern of poor performance.

    • Ummm. I came across a lovely piece today, “The bipartisan catastrophe that’s wasting billions in taxpayer dollars “, http://www.watoday.com.au/national/the-bipartisan-catastrophe-thats-wasting-billions-in-taxpayer-dollars-20160324-gnqe4g.html . It’s looking at the spiralling cost of Tech-Ed.

      But what’s interesting is what the Sky-Blues Did Not Do. In 1993, the Sky-Blues did not gather all the State-based tech. colleges together and call them TAFE Colleges. In 2012 the Sky-Blues did not “gulled the states and territories into defunding their TAFEs with the offer of uncapped Commonwealth money via student loans, in return for making their TAFE systems “contestable”.”

      Yes it is true that “A thoughtless Liberal Party has ideologically pushed the privatisation of vocational education …” but we must remember privatisation is what the Sky-Blues are about, unlike the Pinks. And we must also remember it was the Pinkies which de-regulated the nation’s universities, opening them up for competitive pricing as a means of cutting the cost of education investment by the State.

      BTW, is there a link to your graphic? So we can properly research it?

      • 2.5 years of FTTP rollout were effectively cancelled just as the rollout had started gaining momentum, there’d be likely 3 million premises passed by FTTP by now had Turnbull not trashed NBN co!

        • I totally agree. FTTP was ramping up just like a steam train. (You never saw a steam train take off like a Tesla, did you?) Unfortunately, a steam train was what the Sky-Blues wanted.

          Interesting, the day after 2X rolled the Preacher, an analysis concluded, aaahh, how did it go??? Oh yes: “Turnbull has an exciting view of the future, and Parliament will enthusiastically ensure he gets nowhere near it.”

          I don’t have the highest opinion of pollies, and I see no reason to change my assessment. OTOH, I’m not convinced the numbers presented give an accurate or even truthful picture of Australia’s world standing. Akamai does not enjoy the brightest reputation for some reason.

          • @Reality – wrong verb. But I’ll accept a Freudian typo :)

            It’s official: Labor’s NBN project was failed

            Be careful where you quote from, it may have been contradicted:

            “Labor’s original version of the NBN would have delivered the broadband capability which the global technology industry agrees will be needed for the future. It would have done so in the public interest, with the aim of delivering nation-building infrastructure, and it would have done so using a unified technology platform: The best technology platform.” (Blurb 27-03-2016: “Truth: Google Fiber shows how great a FTTP NBN could be” Renai LeMay – 24/03/2016)

          • wrong verb. But I’ll accept a Freudian typo :)

            It’s not my typo, Freudian or otherwise.

            When looking at the Labor FTTP it’s always in terms of fondly looking at what could have been, they were always in the process of ramping up, they were always going to make up rollout short falls in the next reporting period, next period came and went and it never happened, what did happen though is that rollout targets were drastically cut back in order to try and meet the targets, it still didn’t help.

            The simple fact is the Labor NBN pitiful FTTP connections end result handed the Coalition NBN MtM alternative to them on a plate.

          • Yet it only took 3 month for the Fttn alternative to fail miserably then took another 2 short years for the MTM to fail again.

          • The stat you want is that it took only five months of the FTTN rollout to easily pass the 2010-2013 rollout of the Labor FTTP.

          • The stat you want is that MTM needs to do only 1/10th of the prep work needed by FTTP. So yes, obviously 2X’s Tesla can out-drag the Labor steam-train. But while you’re crowing over the Sky-Blues’ “superior performance”, just spare a thought for the nation who endured the LibCo creation of the Telstra-monster, who’s pits were one reason FTTP took so long to get going?

            I’ve said it before, and I’ll repeat it ad nauseam, I’m no friend of Labor, they don’t deserve me. Labor would have trouble organising a beer-garden at a brewery, you only need look at the Home Insulation debacle.

            But anyone who claims that only the LibCo Sky-Blues can get a National High-speed Broadband in place is seriously in need of professional psychiatric help. There is no doubt that with a further term in office the FTTP program would have been at least as progressed as the MTM is today, simply because NBN workers would have absorbed the knowledge of what they needed to bypass in Telstra’s infrastructure, thus eliminating the need to clean the pits.

          • There is no doubt that with a further term in office the FTTP program would have been at least as progressed as the MTM is today

            Rubbish, there is no way the brownfields FTTP would have progressed as much as the MtM has today.

            Telco’s the world over praise FTTN as being cheaper and faster to deploy than FTTP, the facts on the FTTN RFS stats here in Australia since product release only five months ago speak for themselves.

            They are figures the Labor FTTP could only dream about, they would have been good after three years let alone five months.

            Apparently Australia has this unique world wide infrastructure deployment and costing model that is the opposite to overseas experience.

            FTTP is faster to deploy and cheaper to rollout , but only in Australia, ‘because it just is’.

          • “Rubbish, there is no way the brownfields FTTP would have progressed as much as the MtM has today.”
            Oh? Then how come the FTTP rollout as a whole was only 2 years behind after Labors 6 years in office, whereas the MTM rollout is currently 4 years behind after Liberals were in office for just 2 years?

          • Then how come the FTTP rollout as a whole was only 2 years behind after Labors 6 years in office, whereas the MTM rollout is currently 4 years behind after Liberals were in office for just 2 years?

            Well, the LNP are the ones that want to cut revenue (company tax cuts), while they have both a revenue and spending problem (they are spending a lot more than Labor even did during the GFC stimulus).

            With logic like that, it’s no wonder they are falling behind everywhere else as well…

          • Welcome to today’s alain’s contradiction corner…

            alain here 29/3 – “Rubbish, there is no way the brownfields FTTP would have progressed as much as the MtM has today”

            alain 18/3 – “By June 2017 we will have more FTTN premises Ready for Service than FTTP.”

            Even this time next year, FTTN will still be behind…

            Of course you can always (as you will) include the Telstra and Optus HFC networks you claimed were ready for service sans NBN involvement, as NBN wins…

            Actually you can’t can you? Because they are FAILED (your word) HFC networks aren’t they?

            Oh dear multiple contradictions, upon contradictions.

            You’re welcome.

  16. “the only way to stop our trend downwards is to deploy Fibre to the Premises infrastructure, and price access to it at a level that will allow Australians to access higher speeds. We’re not going to leap in the rankings by only upgrading our copper networks and focusing on 25Mbps speeds. Most other first-world countries are 5-10 years ahead of Australia in doing that.”

    There it is.

    • The vast majority of FTTP users are satisfied with lower speed 12/1 and 25/5 plans.

      To get Australia up higher in the rankings you need to convince punters they need higher speeds.

      There it is.

      • Which is what the EXISTING ADSL2 service already provides.
        We didn’t need to spend a single penny to get that.
        What exactly is the $51b of my taxpayer dollars getting me?

        • Ummm. The EXISTING ADSL2+ service didn’t provide. I live at the end of a 4Km telephone line, my best speeds were 2Mb, usually 1Mb. With FTTP I regularly get 20Mb, I’m not sure how far from the POI I live now, I think it may be 5 or 6 Km. My share of the $51×10^9 taxpayer dollars got me a full magnitude increase. I could have asked and gotten more, but a small (LibCo uncorrected price-point) gets in the way.

      • Nope…

        Once again wrong Reality. I pointed this out for you already, don’t you remember.

        The vast majority are satisfied with the faster 25/5.

        The assumption was that 12/1 would run at 50% for years to come. That has of course been proven substantially incorrect, with a much greater percentage sitting in the 25/5 section.

        You are attempting to lump in the 2 groups together because it makes it look like it is a negative. When in reality the numbers show an expansion at that level.

        And as I have already pointed out, because the FTTP rollout stopped before it could reach a lot of the areas such as inner city etc the high end users that have the disposable income to afford the higher rates are not being serviced by the FTTP option.

        • Woolfe,

          You don’t like putting 12/1 and 25/5 together which after all are the two lowest Teir 1 and Teir 2 speed categories because 78% in 2015 for both doesn’t look good eh?

          You also left out the 100/40 stat which decreased from 2014 at 19% to 16% in 2015.

          Understandable why you don’t want to not mention that.

          • The great thing about statistics, is that people can twist them for whatever narrative they want.

            There are more people on 25/5 than expected, and less on 12/1. You choose to interpret that as negative, and sling the 79% on 25/5 or less, I choose to interpret it as more people on 25/5 and higher than expected.

            The thing is though? Either way you choose to frame it, the result is the same, more people paying more for a connection that originally expected. Less people on 12/1 means more people on higher speeds, paying for the higher tiers which results in more revenue than expected.

          • Reality,

            Why would you put them together at all? There are only 3 tiers now, what is the point of reducing them to 2? That’s a little silly isn’t it?

            78% is a great figure, sure its slightly worse than the original estimate, but there were some contributing factors that affect the Top 20 percent (like you know, tiers not even existing anymore)

            So back to the whole basic maths thing again.
            2015 actuals 12/1 – 35%
            2015 Actuals 25/5 – 42%
            2015 Actuals 100/40 – 18%
            (Not sure where the other 5% is at this stage as it wasn’t reported)

            2012 Estimate 12/1 – 45%
            2012 Estimate 25/5 – 25%
            2012 Estimate 25/10 – 3.5% (Tier doesn’t exist in 2015)
            2012 Estimate 50/20 – 4.5% (Tier doesn’t exist in 2015)
            2012 Estimate 100/40 – 20%
            2012 Estimate 250/100 – 2% (Tier doesn’t exist in 2015)

            So based on the above, the change areas have been in the Tiers that don’t exist anymore (a direct result of the change in government) a small difference in the 100/40 mb tier, and a large difference in the bottom tier.

            So what does that show us. 2 things, there has been a significant increase in the lowest plan. And a substantial decrease in the higher plans.
            But if you then look at them individually to determine why. There is no obvious reason why the lowest plan is lower.
            But with the higher plans, they simply no longer exist. Which means people need to go up a tier or down a tier. Most are choosing down.

            The why of that is the interesting question, and actually deserved of attention. I would hazard a guess that the cost of the 100/40 vs the 50/20 would be the key element at that level, but also we have the problem of demographics. The high value people will generally be focused in certain suburbs/areas that have high disposable income. Looking at the rollouts thus far, those areas have not really been implemented yet.

            But anyway… Come back when you actually know what you are talking about…

            Source
            http://www.nbnco.com.au/assets/documents/nbn-co-corporate-plan-6-aug-2012.pdf Page 64 exhibit 804
            http://www.nbnco.com.au/content/dam/nbnco2/documents/FY15-annual-report.pdf Page 28 under “Fixed Line” heading, second Paragraph

          • Oh and just to clarify. The half year report for 2016 does have the figures. (My search initially didn’t find them)
            This shows the below details.
            2015 actuals(31 Dec) 12/1 33%
            2015 actuals(31 Dec) 25/5 45%
            2015 actuals(31 Dec) 100/40 16%
            (Still missing 6%)

            This does show a much more significant change in the 100/40 tier. But it just goes further to highlight the lack of intervening tiers and the demographic issues. Especially the 50/20 tier.

            http://www.nbnco.com.au/content/dam/nbnco2/documents/nbn-half-year-financial-results-2016-report.pdf
            Page 16
            “As at 31 December 2015, 16 per cent of
            nbn’s fixed line services used a 100/40
            Mbps* wholesale speed tier (31 December
            2014: 19 per cent), 45 per cent used a 25/5
            Mbps* wholesale speed tier (31 December
            2014: 38 per cent), and 33 per cent used
            a 12/1 Mbps* wholesale speed tier
            (31 December 2014: 38 per cent).”

      • “To get Australia up higher in the rankings you need to convince punters they need higher speeds.”
        Which will be impossible for the majority of FTTN connections.

        There it is.

  17. The LNP is committed to delivering the fastest possible Internet speeds in the constrained financial situation our country faces today.

    All of the alternative ‘mixed technologies’ under development or deployment will deliver the highest possible speeds for the lowest possible tax payer dollar consumption. Leaving as many funds as possible for other important areas of spending such as health, education, national defence, social security, etc.

    Even Labors plan was somewhat mixed technology because it relied on satellite and wireless which nothing has changed there.

    Labor alternatively has promised that if they are elected, the first *year* will comprise of a ‘review’ of the NBN, pending the outcome of the ‘review’; according to shadow communications minister Jason Clare; any new fibre-to-the-premises would only be extremely ‘limited in scope’ due to the already large investment in cheaper alternative technologies.

    So if Labor wins the election this year, a review is for 2017, leaving less than 2 years to change anything ‘on the ground’ deployment wise, which confirms Clares promise of any new fibre being ‘limited in scope’. Most likely they will pork barrel Labor electorates so unless you have a Labor member for parliament you won’t get anything, where as if the LNP are re-elected you will at least have a higher chance of getting basic upgrades to high-speed node or distribution based services or if you’re really lucky upgraded hybrid fibre coaxial services (HFC/Cable).

    For the first year while the review takes place Labor will continue rolling out the mixed technology model, and even after the review with a ‘limited in scope’ fibre-to-the-premises deployment, the rest of the premises will still continue to receive a multi-technology model.

    So that is the fact of the matter on this, and the LNP has said all along that if they encounter a situation where fibre-to-the-premises appears to be the cheapest solution, they have no ideological issue to rolling it out in that area for instance where there is bad copper but high population density.

    I would urge people of *all* political persuasions to be open-minded to the cheapest but fastest *possible* solution in the extremely financially constrained position our country faces. Yes fibre-to-the-premises is technologically superior but in times such as we face, and in such an enormous country as Australia, sometimes a little patriotism is necessary, accepting an alternative solution for the ‘greater good’ of a better budgetary position is necessary in my opinion. Sometimes its necessary to accept such solutions as the mixed technology model without expressing a sense of entitlement or jealousy at other countries in the knowledge that everything possible is being done about the situation and a little patience and open mindedness goes a long way.

    And perhaps also acknowledging that just as you may claim the LNP policy has problems, acknowledging that Labors former policy also had problems, such as wasting a large amount of funds on passing homes that already had extremely fast Internet via HFC/Cable or in some cases Telstra fibre-to-the-premises. In an ideal world those funds would have been better used passing homes that had limited access.

    Regarding concerns about the copper network, there are reports that the state of the network may not have been as bad as was thought, admittedly there was a problem with Telstras maintenance of it, but it seems that it will not cost as much as previously thought to correct which does pave the way for lower cost deployment via node or distribution point based fibre deployment.

    Regards,
    aaricus.

    • Aaricus
      So coalition only saving $1B taxpayer money since there cap is $29B and labor $30B.

      But it’s not cheapest now $56B total more than labor FTTP of $44B not fastest taking just as long as labor plan FTTP. The current gov is spending as much as labor did during the GFC but that OK for there supporters becuase they “claim” to have cut spending.

      So if HFC is already faster why is the NBN paying for upgrade to 3.1 when the CBA currently say we only need 15Mbps. ADSL 2+ does than.

      Yes the cooper wouldn’t need much fixing to just supply 25Mbps.

      • Rizz,

        Deliberate misquoting and tortured grammar so no one knows what you are talking about, is that the best the ‘Back to 2013’ cheer squad can come up with week after week, month after month, year in year out?

        Yes.

        • Devoid can you give links of the claim of misquoting would be nice other go back under you bridge.

        • Deliberate misquoting and tortured grammar so no one knows what you are talking about

          Sounds a lot like you, Yoda…

          • Don’t worry tin he is just following his hero Abbott when faced with facts he can’t dispute he has to go into bully mode

        • Reality

          Is it possible that the cost will be $56 billion? Based on what NBN themselves have said?

      • @jason
        The Coalitions vision for “cheaper” is the same as their vision for “fast”.
        If at any point it is cheaper, even if it’s only for a second, then it must be good.
        If at any point your broadband is able to hit a specific level, even if only for a second, then it must be alright…

        Not exactly the stuff to inspire confidence, eh? Long term and overall benefit be damned…

    • “the constrained financial situation our country faces today.”
      The ‘constrained financial situation’ that has tripled our debt since LNP came in to play.

      “the highest possible speeds for the lowest possible tax payer dollar consumption”
      Some new FTTN areas are now being provisioned with services with lower performance than their old ADSL2 service, at a total cost to the nation of double that of Labors FTTP plan.

      “Leaving as many funds as possible for other important areas of spending such as health, education”
      Which were both cut.

      “Labors plan was somewhat mixed technology because it relied on satellite and wireless which nothing has changed there.”
      Many wireless connections have been replaced by satellite.

      “that is the fact of the matter on this”
      Interesting take on ‘facts’.

      “the LNP has said all along that if they encounter a situation where fibre-to-the-premises appears to be the cheapest solution, they have no ideological issue to rolling it out in that area for instance where there is bad copper but high population density.”
      Like in Greenfields estates whereby they deregulated a FTTP requirement and Telstra now actively roll copper out?

      “sometimes a little patriotism is necessary”
      Yup, let’s replace facts and figures with ‘she’ll be right mate’ and blind faith in the criminals abusing positions of power because fucktards like yourself are happy to not only let them get away with it, but actively encourage others to stop whining about abject corruption?

      “such as wasting a large amount of funds on passing homes that already had extremely fast Internet via HFC/Cable or in some cases Telstra fibre-to-the-premises”
      You realise the LNP has done just as much of this?

      “Regarding concerns about the copper network, there are reports that the state of the network may not have been as bad as was thought”
      Said reports were shot down by revelations that nbn is buying billions worth of new copper to fix areas that couldn’t possibly be serviced previously, despite your claims (read: lies) that FTTP would be rolled out in such instances.

      ” it seems that it will not cost as much as previously thought to correct”
      You’re right; they estimated a couple hundred million.

      • Yup, let’s replace facts and figures with ‘she’ll be right mate’ and blind faith in the criminals abusing positions of power because fucktards like yourself are happy to not only let them get away with it, but actively encourage others to stop whining about abject corruption?

        Indeed Hotcakes. You know I’m still trying to figure out where all this gung-ho patriotism was when we were rolling out FttP. Ill-informed commentators like aricmus were obliviously happy to keep quiet now it’s “Stick another shrimp on the node-bq”

        • Did you notice they all started coming out since the talk of an election Hubert?

          Very curious….

          • Yep, the liberal parties synthetic grass laying arms are ramping up their b.s. Production Already!

  18. And the nbn circus rolls on, with the executive shoulders deep with their head in the sand…

  19. I would urge people of *all* political persuasions to be open-minded to the cheapest but fastest *possible* solution in the extremely financially constrained position our country faces. Yes fibre-to-the-premises is technologically superior but in times such as we face, and in such an enormous country as Australia, sometimes a little patriotism is necessary, accepting an alternative solution for the ‘greater good

    Possibly the most idiotic comment I’ve read this week on the subject. If the “financial situation” was as dire as your hyperbolic statements make it out to be we wouldn’t be rolling out any thing at all especially a MTM patchwork for $56 billion. “greater good” lol. just lol.

    • It’s not $56B, start again.

      lol you and the MtM band of brothers have to constantly deliberately misquote.

      just lol.

        • It doesn’t claim it won’t cost $40 trillion either, I will add playing stupid mindless games with semantics to the deliberate misquote list of MtM bashers strategy 101.

          • Devoid delusions again asked a simple question doesn’t want to answer becuase it will prove him wrong. But then again hockey claimed it will cost $70B should we start using that figure since you claim $56B is wrong.

          • But then again hockey claimed it will cost $70B should we start using that figure since you claim $56B is wrong.

            Very good point Jason. Noted.

          • Now your misquoting, it doesn’t mention 40 trillion, because it isn’t actually in there. It does mention 56b though…like it or not, it’s there.

          • Yes in the upper end of the estimated funding range as in … up to $56B, never quoted as such by MtM bashers because the need to exaggerate and misquote is lazy and easy arguing and is preferable to rational researched argument.

            Just a reminder on what the latest FTTP researched funding figures are from CP 16, $74-$84B finish date 2026-2028.

            So referring to FTTP funding as $85B with a finish date of 2028 is ok using the MtM bashers misquote strategy?

          • Sorry devoid comment invalid as the $85B and 2028 is if NBN goes back to doing FTTP with all the cost blowout I mean “revised” not if they have continued FTTP but thanks your showing us what a real misquote is lol.

            But even if you would like to used Turnbull own figures $64B if they had continued and only 2023. But that can’t be right it almost cost the same as the $56B MTM even though your beloved CP16 has said the SR are the best estimates available

          • “Just a reminder on what the latest FTTP researched funding figures are from CP 16”

            So you think it will cost 2-3 times as much as any other country is spending. That’s some pretty serious gullibility there…
            I am sure that if we used the cost structure of 10 years ago, and hypothesized that none of the current or future cost-cutting technologies could possibly exist for FTTP, then yes…that figure might be valid. Sadly for you, that hypothesis has already been proven false all across the planet.

          • Chas,

            Sadly for you, that hypothesis has already been proven false all across the planet.

            Sadly for you when we look at the facts the opposite is true.

            I understand your amateur armchair theorising overrides what is happening in the real world.

            “We have invested £3 billion ($5.9bn) but to do FTTH (fibre-to-the-home) it would have been ten times that and the speed of deployment would have been at 10 per cent at this point,” Mr Patterson said. “The case for us to pay back on FTTH was simply not there,

            http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/technology/nbn-co-unites-with-british-telecom-on-secrets-of-speed/news-story/59d1cd696ffb4bd1cabb81c4416d04a1

          • “Just a reminder on what the latest FTTP researched funding figures are from CP 16, $74-$84B finish date 2026-2028.”
            When will you stop embarrassing yourself, Alain?
            https://delimiter.com.au/2016/03/22/google-fiber-shows-people-dont-want-fttp-says-morrow/#li-comment-725037

            “The latest estimates from CP16 refers directly to SR13 (whose figures were cooked for obvious reasons) for Labors FTTP figures, the figures you are referring to AS YOU ARE WELL AWARE are for if MTM was dropped today and FTTP was started from the beginning.

            ERGO, since the SR13, Morrow, Turnbull and a handful of other MTM supporters all admit that FTTP is the long term goal, which will need to start being built 5-10 years after MTM is completed (oops, that was from 2016, now only 6 years max after completion, you know, until the next time MTM completion date is ‘revised’, in roughly 2.5 years from today), ERGO the CP16 figures for FTTP is the FULL COST OF THE MTM.

            Only double what Labor was on target for. Well done, Australia.”

          • So referring to FTTP funding as $85B with a finish date of 2028 is ok using the MtM bashers misquote strategy?

          • Well devoid are you claimed the $85B and 2028 as if they had continued the FTTP rollout or restarting the rollout.

          • We cannot restart the FTTP rollout that was 50% behind original estimates from 2013.

            You and other ‘Back to 2013’ FTTP fans need to get your head into 2016, this is what happened three years ago, Labor lost the election to a alternative NBN policy.

            Sorry to bring reality crashing around your FTTP fantasy bubble.

          • Lol devoid doesn’t want to look ba k at previous figures becuase it makes the MTM a joke. As the MTM is takeing just as long and costing as much as fttp. We must be so unique in the world for that to happen.

            Well devoid is it better tone 50% behind on there targets or more than 75% on the current mess. Will we be expect ion a 3rd cost blow out or a 4th revised on the election policy of just $29B complete by 2016 oh wait that’s this year

          • If there original estimate of $29B complete by this year.

            Atleast labor FTTP never changed tits complete date lol

            But then they keep changing the goal post to claim they hit targets lol

          • Yes I thought you would come back with some meaningless indecipherable rubbish.

            Here some more facts about meeting targets.

            Morrow said this rapid acceleration of the NBN rollout was due to incorporating the FTTN technology into the NBN company’s rollout. The NBN company’s current targets state that it needs to reach less than 300,000 premises over the next 13 weeks to reach its mid-2016 target.

            “With no further acceleration, that would require only 23,000 per week. However, as I said, this last month has averaged over 35,000 a week,” said Morrow. “So we can certainly make the claim we are on track.

            https://delimiter.com.au/2016/03/15/simply-incorrect-morrow-refutes-nbn-leaks-evidence/

          • Devoid delusions in full swing again have no relation to what we are talking about keep up the good work.

            Here are some good facts about meeting targets
            2013 pre election policy $29B complete be 2016.
            2013 SR $41B 4.5M by 2016 complete be 2020
            2015 CP16 up to lol $56B 2.5M by 2016 complete by 2020.

            2014 changed rollout target 3 times to then be able to claim they hit a target.

          • Wow about time you would say something correct.
            But like the 50% miss target vs 75% miss target which is better
            2 years behind or 4 years behind lol

          • Oh you let your deliberate misquote go through to the keeper with no apology and started talking about something else.

            It’s not 30k FTTN RFS for five months it’s 120,000 but you know that and deliberately misquote that as well.

          • Lol devoid are you now claiming NBN misquoting them selves

            The document notes that the NBN company had at 19 February this year only successfully completed construction of its Fibre to the Node network to some 29,005 premises

            Or would you like me to start the rollout from when they switched to MTM backing in 2013 now that is a blistering faster rollout.

          • Wrong again.

            The performance across the company was complemented by a number of milestones in the multi-technology mix, including the commercial launch of the FTTN product. More than 120,000 premises are now ready-for-service (RFS), with demand strong in initial launch areas such as Bundaberg, QLD and Belmont, NSW. More than 600,000 premises are currently under construction and a further 1,289,000 in design and preparation, with the company on track to meet the full year RFS footprint target of 500,000 FTTN premises.

            The accelerated results for nbn in deploying FTTN is becoming evident, with approximately 34,000 premises being added to the footprint in January 2016, at a rate of 8,000 per week (12-week rolling average). This rate of growth was achieved four months after the product launch in late September 2015.

            http://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-releases/Strong-result-continues-nbns-momentum-to-full-year-targets.html

          • So devoid we have 2 documents from the same company saying 2 different things. I would believe the leak one over the PR one.

          • More than 120,000 premises are now ready-for-service (RFS)

            Yes I can understand the MtM bashers ‘blink fast syndrome’ cutting in at that statement when comparing it with appalling Labor FTTP three year RFS figures.

            No wonder you and the band of brothers don’t want to believe it.

            The fact you don’t believe it is of no consequence at all.

            LOL

          • Lol devoid

            Yes I can understand the Fttp bashers ‘blink fast syndrome’ cutting in at that statement when comparing it with appalling MTM/FTTN three year RFS figures. What happen to the start of the mass rollout in 2014 that was going to happen.

            No wonder you don’t want to accept it.

            The fact you don’t accept it is of no consequence at all.

          • Re: the 120,000 premises RFS claims.

            120,000 includes FTTB, which we have been through previously, is disingenuous to claim they are FTTN whether Labor was using it or not.

            NBN Co could claim all Fibre based broadband the same and call it the “Fibre footprint” lumping all FTTP, FTTN, FTTB and FTTdp together and have massive numbers that you could then point to, to “prove” how much better they are now, but it doesn’t change the fact that the rollout methodologies for FTTN and FTTB are entirely different, and lumping them together is ridiculous for claiming how many “FTTN” customers there are.

          • You are correct, and we have discussed this at length before and you ignored the responses you didn’t like then as now.

            Take it up with the NBN Co, when the Labor NBN Co quoted FTTP figures it also included their version of FTTB figures.

            Did you protest about that at the time? or is that a different sort of categorising together because umm err it’s ok because Labor were rolling out FTTP and I don’t like FTTN.

          • “Take it up with the NBN Co, when the Labor NBN Co quoted FTTP figures it also included their version of FTTB figures.”

            Except it didn’t, because FTTB wasn’t part of the Labor plan, and you have jumped up and down so much in the past about the failure Labor made by not including it in their plan, and not allowing NBN Co to build it.

            Which is it?

            NBN Co didn’t start FTTB trials until the Coalition were at the helm, so, how on earth did Labor build FTTB before trialing it? Hint: They didn’t. They were running FTTP to MDU’s just like Telstra and Optus did with HFC in the 90’s then had issues with bodies corporate getting inside to install fibre, or having no actual way to install the fibre to each single unit.

            More historical revisionism from our resident LibTrolls.

          • “So referring to FTTP funding as $85B with a finish date of 2028 is ok”
            When will you stop embarrassing yourself, Alain?
            https://delimiter.com.au/2016/03/22/google-fiber-shows-people-dont-want-fttp-says-morrow/#li-comment-725037

            The latest estimates from CP16 refers directly to SR13 (whose figures were cooked for obvious reasons) for Labors FTTP figures, the figures you are referring to AS YOU ARE WELL AWARE are for if MTM was dropped today and FTTP was started from the beginning.

            ERGO, since the SR13, Morrow, Turnbull and a handful of other MTM supporters all admit that FTTP is the long term goal, which will need to start being built 5-10 years after MTM is completed (oops, that was from 2016, now only 6 years max after completion, you know, until the next time MTM completion date is ‘revised’, in roughly 2.5 years from today), ERGO the CP16 figures for FTTP is the FULL COST OF THE MTM.

            Compare : Last full estimate cost of Labors FTTP – $43B. Last full estimate cost of Liberals MTM (CP16) – $85B.

            Only double what Labor was on target for. Well done, Australia.

      • The current worst case scenario, as suggested by NBN co, is that the cost will be $56 billion. It is as simple as that.

        • The worst case scenario as suggested by the NBN Co for FTTP was $84B with a finish date of 2028.

          It is as simple as that.

          • Wrong comment invalid

            What the cost of if the had continued FTTP to the restart lol

          • “The worst case scenario as suggested by the NBN Co for FTTP was $84B with a finish date of 2028.”
            When will you stop embarrassing yourself, Alain?
            https://delimiter.com.au/2016/03/22/google-fiber-shows-people-dont-want-fttp-says-morrow/#li-comment-725037

            The latest estimates from CP16 refers directly to SR13 (whose figures were cooked for obvious reasons) for Labors FTTP figures, the figures you are referring to AS YOU ARE WELL AWARE are for if MTM was dropped today and FTTP was started from the beginning.

            ERGO, since the SR13, Morrow, Turnbull and a handful of other MTM supporters all admit that FTTP is the long term goal, which will need to start being built 5-10 years after MTM is completed (oops, that was from 2016, now only 6 years max after completion, you know, until the next time MTM completion date is ‘revised’, in roughly 2.5 years from today), ERGO the CP16 figures for FTTP is the FULL COST OF THE MTM.

            Compare : Last full estimate cost of Labors FTTP – $43B. Last full estimate cost of Liberals MTM (CP16) – $85B.

            It is as simple as that.

          • So are you saying that NBN are not saying that the cost could be “Up to $56 billion”?

            Is that correct Reality?

          • It doesn’t really matter what alain says now to suit the narrative, when he will say the complete opposite to suit the narrative tomorrow (nay in 5 minutes)…

            I can supply many very humorous and (for him) humiliating examples if alain would like…

            You’re welcome alain…

  20. “Australia’s peak average broadband speed is now 39.3Mbps”

    who is getting that? It’s an average? Are they only measuring people who have been connected to the NBN?

  21. I had a Labor minister for my electorate, didn’t get me NBN like you’re suggesting it did.

    In fact they rolled it out to areas that already had some decent infrastructure such as Vic Park (Bright Fibre), areas that had HFC, or newer estates that were easy to connect.

    Just for the record I live ~5 minute drive from the CBD (Perth) in an old area, my phone cable is direct buried and people struggle to even get a phone line connected.

    Personally I’ve all but given up on seeing any decent Internet connectivity in the next ten years.

  22. Wow I haven’t even been here and “alain/reality” is replying to me… ROFL

    Reality how ironic is that moniker eh?

    You’re welcome

    • Everyone is you, Rizz. Everyone.

      I wonder where Richard has been lately, its basically now just Alain “fighting the “good” fight” alone nowadays, with other randoms popping their head in from time to time to make a ridiculous statement then disappear for a week.

      • I wonder where Richard has been lately

        I just assumed he committed suicide because the $70 billion coalition clown MTM patchwork plan he endorsed turned out to be the unmitigated disaster we predicted it would be.

Comments are closed.