• Catch issues early, fix them fast – Free trial


    [ad] With GFI Cloud you can easily manage and secure your remote workforce – wherever they are, from wherever you are! The simple IT management platform includes patch management, antivirus, web protection, monitoring and remote control. Get the benefit of endpoint protection with the ease of central management. Start a free trial now.


  • Great articles on other sites
  • RSS Great articles on other sites


  • Blog, Telecommunications - Written by on Thursday, March 7, 2013 12:54 - 13 Comments

    Vodafone CEO backs Quigley NBN study

    blog Remember how NBN Co chief executive Mike Quigley gave a major speech several weeks ago backing the idea that telco industry group the Communications Alliance could conduct a study into the merits of the various different broadband models being proposed for Australia’s future? Remember how the idea was roundly rejected by the Coalition and various telcos such as Optus? Well not everyone things this way. Vodafone chief executive Bill Morrow in Communications Day this week on the idea:

    “NBN Co’s recent calls for an industry discussion on how we optimise the opportunities of the NBN should not be controversial. There will always be ongoing discussions about how we meet the telecommunications needs of Australia. Provided these discussions are done transparently and collaboratively they should be encouraged.”

    I strongly agree. How could it possibly be bad to have more analysis, more examination of the potential paths towards Australia’s broadband future? More information is never a bad thing — I think history shows us that ignorance and misinformation is usually the real plague on society. Let’s hope the Communications Alliance consents to working on this. It could prove to be a valuable resource for the whole sector.

    submit to reddit

    13 Comments

    You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

    1. Daniel
      Posted 07/03/2013 at 1:01 pm | Permalink |

      Again can anyone tell me why we need a study?

      Tony Abbott just lied to the public about it costing 3x as much? Shouldn’t we be focusing on these issues rather than the study?

      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/04/abbott_raises_cost_bogeyman/

      Both You, sortius, theregister have done the work that is required…

      • Frank
        Posted 07/03/2013 at 1:17 pm | Permalink |

        “Again can anyone tell me why we need a study?”

        Because it will show (again) that FTTN is not the right solution for Australia.

        • NBNAlex
          Posted 09/03/2013 at 10:50 am | Permalink |

          I think that’s Quigley’s intention ;)

    2. stephen hall
      Posted 07/03/2013 at 1:22 pm | Permalink |

      “How could it possibly be bad to have more analysis, more examination of the potential paths towards Australia’s broadband future? More information is never a bad thing”

      You may be right in this case but all too often more studies are just a way of avoiding a decision. How many studies have we had into Sydney’s 2nd airport?

      • AJ
        Posted 07/03/2013 at 1:36 pm | Permalink |

        They will not stop rolling out the NBN to do this

        • Bern
          Posted 07/03/2013 at 1:48 pm | Permalink |

          The Noalition would… Especially as their version would be arranged to give the answers they want politically.

    3. Brendan
      Posted 07/03/2013 at 5:46 pm | Permalink |

      The report would put to bed, once and for-all the FTTN “is better than” FTTH notion. Turnbull doesn’t want a report he cannot self-engineer; he already knows the outcome. Hence his outright rejection.

      Quigley has suggested it, for that very reason. He already knows the outcome too.

      • NBNAccuracy
        Posted 07/03/2013 at 7:36 pm | Permalink |

        It’s not which is the better technology. I don’t think even Turnbull is suggesting it is. What the issue to be decided is which is the best and most economical way foward. Saying FTTN is cheaper just doesn’t cut it. Ignoring what it will cost to upgrade and when it will need that upgrade is the bit Turnbull will avoid like the plague or pull numbers out of his butt. It’s what happens after FTTN that is it’s achilles heel. Hay, maybe having to buy copper will even make it uneconomical now. But without address all the issues and calling supporters zealots and journalists biased they should be answered. Sticking fingers in the ears and going lalala doesn’t solve problems.

    4. Abel Adamski
      Posted 07/03/2013 at 11:03 pm | Permalink |

      http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/government-it/broadband-blues-thousands-stuck-in-the-slow-lane-20130307-2fmw4.html

      In MSM highlighting the very poor state of the customer end copper infrastructure which has been well known and discussed in tech circles, now the discussion is beginning in the MSM highlighting the foolishness of a FTTN solution using Telstra’s intentionally run down network.

      The plot thickens with non techo’s asking questions

    5. alain
      Posted 08/03/2013 at 8:31 am | Permalink |

      There is no need to for the Communications Alliance to spend money on such a study I can tell you what the result will be.

      Keep the current FTTH NBN rollout going financed by Government debt and all risk backed by the Government.

      • NBNAlex
        Posted 08/03/2013 at 8:43 am | Permalink |

        Great, seems we all agree that this is the best path then :)

        • alain
          Posted 08/03/2013 at 10:00 am | Permalink |

          What else would they say, we will build it?

          • NBNAlex
            Posted 08/03/2013 at 5:00 pm | Permalink |

            No of course they won’t build it… no one will… hence the fact that we are now in the position we are… you do remember the RFPs, Telstra’s non-compliant bid and understand this most basic of facts don’t you?




    Get our 'Best of the Week' newsletter on Fridays

    Just the most important stories, one email a week.

    Email address:


  • Most Popular Content

  • Enterprise IT stories

    • Super funds close to dumping $250m IT revamp facepalm2

      If you have even a skin deep awareness of the structure of Australia’s superannuation industry, you’ll be aware that much of the underlying infrastructure used by many of the nation’s major funds — AustralianSuper, CBus, HESTA and more — is provided by a centralised group, Superpartners. One of the group’s main projects in recent years has been to dramatically update and modernise its IT platform — its version of a core banking platform overhaul. Unfortunately, as was revealed in November, the $250 million project has not precisely been going well, and the Financial Review last week reported that Superpartners is actually close to turfing it altogether and going back to the drawing board.

    • Qld’s Grant joins analyst firm IBRS peter-grant

      This week it emerged that Peter Grant, the two-time former Queensland Whole of Government CIO (pictured), has joined well-regarded analyst firm Intelligent Business Research Services (IBRS). We’ve long had a high regard for IBRS, and so it’s fantastic to see such an experienced executive join its ranks.

    • Westpac dumps desk phones for Samsung Android mobiles samsung-galaxy-ace-3

      The era of troublesome desk phones tied to physical locations is gradually coming to an end in many workplaces, with mobile phones becoming increasingly popular as organisations’ main method of voice telecommunications. But some groups are more advanced than others when it comes to adoption of the trend. One of those is Westpac.

    • Ministers’ cloud approval lasted just a year reverse

      Remember how twelve months ago, the Federal Government released a new cloud computing security and privacy directive which required departments and agencies to explicitly acquire the approval of the Attorney-General and the relevant portfolio minister before government data containing private information could be stored in offshore facilities? Remember how the policy was strongly criticised by Microsoft, Government CIOs and Delimiter? Well, it looks like the policy is about to be reversed.

    • WA Govt can’t fund school IT upgrades oops key

      In news from The Department of Disturbing Facts, iTNews revealed late last week that Western Australia’s Department of Education has run out of money halfway through the deployment of new fundamental IT infrastructure to the state’s schools.

    • Turnbull outlines Govt ICT vision turnbull-5

      Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull has published an extensive article arguing that the Federal Government needed to do a better job of connecting with Australians via digital channels and that public sector IT projects needn’t cost the huge amounts that some have in the past.

    • NZ Govt pushes hard into cloud zealand

      New Zealand’s national Government announced a whole of government contract this morning for what it terms ‘Office Productivity as a Service’ services. This includes email and calendaring services, as well as file-sharing, mobility, instant messaging and collaboration services. The contract complements two existing contracts — Desktop as a Service and Enterprise Content Management as a Service.

    • CommBank reveals Harte’s replacement whiteing

      The Commonwealth Bank of Australia has promoted an internal executive who joined the bank in September after a lengthy career at petroleum giant VP and IT services group Accenture to replace its outgoing chief information officer Michael Harte, who announced in early May that he would leave the bank.

    • Jeff Smith quits Suncorp for IBM jeffsmith4

      Second-tier Australian bank and financial services group Suncorp today announced that its long-serving top technology executive Jeff Smith would leave to take up a senior role with IBM in the United States, in an announcement which marks the end of an era for the nation’s banking IT sector.

    • Small business missing the mobile, social, cloud revolution iphone-stock

      Most companies that live and breathe the online revolution are not tech startups, but smart smaller firms that use online tools to run their core business better: to cut costs, reach customers and suppliers, innovate and get more control. Many others, however, are falling behind, according to a new Grattan Institute discussion paper.

  • Blog, Enterprise IT - Jul 5, 2014 13:53 - 0 Comments

    Super funds close to dumping $250m IT revamp

    More In Enterprise IT


    Blog, Telecommunications - Jul 5, 2014 12:12 - 0 Comments

    What should the ACCC’s role be in guiding infrastructure spending?

    More In Telecommunications


    Analysis, Industry, Internet - Jun 23, 2014 10:33 - 0 Comments

    ‘Google Schmoogle’ – how Yellow Pages got it so wrong

    More In Industry


    Blog, Digital Rights - Jun 30, 2014 22:24 - 0 Comments

    Will Netflix launch in Australia, or not?

    More In Digital Rights