• Enjoy the freedom to innovate and grow your business


    [ad] With Microsoft Azure you have hybrid cloud flexibility, allowing your platform to span your cloud and on premise data centre. Learn more at microsoftcloud.com.

  • IT Admin: No Time to Save Time?


    [ad] Do you spend too much time patching machines or cleaning up after virus attacks? With automation controlled from a central IT management console accessible anytime, anywhere – you can save time for bigger tasks. Try simple IT management from GFI Cloud and start saving time today!

  • Free Forrester analysis of CRM solutions


    [ad] In this 25 page report, independent analyst house Forrester evaluates 18 significant products in the customer relationship management space from a broad range of vendors, detailing its findings on how CRM suites measure up and plotting where they stand in relation to each other. Download it for free now.

  • Great articles on other sites
  • RSS Great articles on other sites


  • Reader giveaway: Google Nexus 5


    We’re big fans of Google’s Nexus line-up in general at Delimiter towers. Nexus 4, Nexus 7, Nexus 10 … we love pretty much anything Nexus. Because of this we've kicked off a new competition to give away one of Google’s new Nexus 5 smartphones to a lucky reader. Click here to enter.

  • Featured, Features - Written by on Thursday, December 23, 2010 16:26 - 12 Comments

    The eBook executive with the Google tattoo

    When you ask Google’s Mark Tanner what books he’s been reading recently, you had better have a few minutes to discuss the subject, because the enthusiasm bursts out of him wholesale. “I just finished Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut,” he says, referring to the science fiction classic. “Fantastic read.”

    Lots of people in Australia’s IT industry are into sci-fi — and we’re betting many Google staffers love fantasy too. But sports books are also on Tanner’s radar. He’s also been recently reading Andre Agassi’s autobiography, Open, for example, which chronicles the life and times of the international tennis megastar. And then there’s Greg Mortenson’s Three Cups of Tea — an inspirational read which tells of the author’s gargantuan yet human effort constructing schools across Asia.

    Hard science is also on Tanner’s shelf; “I started reading A Brief History of Time,” he says, referring to the popular book by British physicist Stephen Hawking, “and like everyone else failed by the sixth chapter”. Now he’s reading Hawking’s follow-up book A Briefer History of Time.

    In a way, you might say, Tanner’s a typical book buff — multiple books on the go, in multiple genres, some unfinished, a giant set of bookcases at home with volumes gathering dust and piled everywhere. However, Tanner’s not just any book industry executive — he’s Google’s strategic partner development manager in Australia for the publishing industry. And so it’s the way he has increasingly started reading books that gives us a clue into the future of book publishing.

    For example, when the executive was reading Agassi’s autobiography, he says, he wasn’t just flipping through the pages of a paper tome. Instead — because he was reading the book through a web browser — he kept on taking advantages of the inherent strengths of the emerging digital medium.

    “You’re reading online, and then you come across this match he talks about,” he says. Then, Tanner says, you open a new tab in your browser and Google the match Agassi’s describing, to find a YouTube clip of the highlights. Or, he adds, “you come across an old tennis player you haven’t heard of” — and Google them.

    Then, too, Tanner doesn’t just read paper books.

    “I regularly read on my phone,” he says. “I used to read a lot on e-ink devices — I’ve tried them all. I surprise myself by how often I’ve been reading on my laptop.” Anything’s appropriate, according to the executive — as long as “the device doesn’t get in the way” of the experience.

    It’s this new type of reading — where readers have access to so much more than just the pages of a book they have purchased, and where they can choose to read on any device a book they have purchased, that is key to the eBook vision which Google is pushing internationally at the moment.

    In early December this year, the search giant unveiled what it calls its Google eBookstore, with more than three million titles available for book buffs to choose from and read on many devices — including hundreds of thousands of books available for sale.

    In doing so, Google has followed in the footsteps of some giant rivals — companies like Amazon, Apple, and in Australia, the Borders/Kobo alliance, already have substantial eBook presences, millions of customers and are growing fast in the new digital publishing world. However, speaking to Tanner in an interview this week, it seems as if Google has come at the eBook problem from a different angle.

    The search giant has long — as part of its mission to “organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful” — had a product which has been taking the metadata available in books and making it searchable public on the web, in coalition with publishing partners.

    With a preview also available, the program has become a powerful marketing tool for publishers who want to expose their books to more readers online. After previewing a book, readers could then click through to a retailer to buy it. However, Tanner says the company’s next eBook step — its eBookstore — has resulted from organic conversations with publishers, who wanted an ecommerce layer on top of Google’s existing functionality.

    Google’s eBookstore will also integrate with local booksellers’ websites, connecting up the dots in the book ecosystem, from author, to publisher, to digital platform and retailer.

    The only catch? Google eBooks isn’t available yet in Australia — at least not for book purchases. So far it’s limited to US customers, although companies like Apple, Amazon and Borders already have paid eBook options available down under. We gave Google a hard time for this when the product launched — but Tanner’s presence and energy in Australia has done much to reassure the search giant’s Australian division is on the case.

    Tanner says Google is “pushing to take this internationally as quickly as we can”, and emphasises that Australia is in the top group of countries the search giant is focused on rolling out Google eBooks to.

    There’s “a range of factors” which have to be worked out for the product to hit Australia, he says — from retailer integration, working with publishers, getting book editions right, integratingt he right currency and even working with different teams within Google — those focused on the Checkout and Android technologies, for example.

    The good news, however, is that the US launch of Google eBooks went “spectacularly well”, according to Tanner — which bodes good things for Australia. And Google has also recently been talking up the potential for the platform to launch internationally in the first quarter of 2011 — meaning Australia could see some action very soon.

    The ecosystem
    One of the things which readers complain about most with eBooks is the patchy availability of titles. When Delimiter did a survey of the eBooks available from Amazon on its Kindle device in July, for example — shortly after Tanner was appointed — the US book giant came up a little short.

    Many popular Australian authors, such as Bryce Courtenay, for example, didn’t have any eBooks available in the Amazon store — and most of the rest we could find, for example, David Malouf, Tim Winton, Helen Garner and DBC Pierre, only had some of their books and not all. In addition, the overall number of books in the Australian version of the Amazon store suffers when compared with the US version.

    Tanner (pictured, right) is in a somewhat unique position in the Australian publishing market — constantly talking to local publishers and even authors about Google’s offerings. As such, and with several years of history in the market, he has a more granular insight into why the availability problem occurs than most.

    The executive says it’s no secret that digital publishing is on the verge of becoming mainstream — “it’s been coming for 10 to 12 years,” he says, noting in the past three years the topic has become “very strong” in the market, with a lot of eReader products launching and discussion in the media. However, where publishers were fearful of the disruptive phenomenon in the past, he says, now things have changed — with “publisher after publisher” that he’s talking to being enthusiastic about it — and the authors keen as well.

    Complicating this, however, according to Tanner, is the tricky contracts between publishers and authors, which often vary even between the same author’s books, and haven’t always covered digital rights. The better publishing houses have changed their contracts to take digital publishing into account, he says, “but it’s a long, hard slog” in terms of the back catalogue.

    Publishing rights are usually allocated by territory — for example, for the UK and US markets separately, but some publishers are pushing for global digital rights. Tanner says the licensing situation made sense historically for the paper medium. “I think over the next few years it will probably get sorted out and become a little cleaner,” he says.

    But in general, the Google executive believes publishers understand readers’ complaints when books don’t launch in Australia at the same time as they do globally, and when eBook formats aren’t available at launch to suit readers’ viewing platforms. Partly, it’s because if publishers don’t capitalise on initial global marketing of a book by having it available on launch day, their sales could suffer.

    It’s a similar situation when it comes to Australian book retailers.

    “Everyone knows that it’s coming,” says Tanner, and the retailers want to be proactive about the eBook revolution. But it can also be expensive. Initially, Google is focusing on an affiliate model which allows retailers to get a percentage of sales for referrals, but the company also wants to work on more substantial integration projects with the retailers.

    “There’s very, very strong enthusiasm for that locally,” he says. And it’s not hard to see why — local retailers should eventually be able to benefit from Google’s global relationships with thousands of book publishers worldwide. The retailer will be able to “own the experience” on their own site, but have their back end powered by Google.

    However, initially Google will focus on larger projects down under — as retailers will need to have a website with very strong internet capacity, to handle the massive feed of Google book data the search giant will funnel to them.

    Authors
    Another possible aspect of the future publishing industry is that individual authors will take distribution into their own hands and sidestep publishers altogether, using platforms such as the ones offered by Apple and Google to go directly to readers.

    Tanner notes that to a certain extent, this has already started happening, highlighting the success of New York Times bestselling author Lisa Genova internationally, with her book Still Alice. After a frustrating year attempting to deal with the publishing industry, Genova set up her own web site, with an associated blog, to market her book, which deals with the disease Alzheimers’. And the move was successful — the book started selling well online.

    However, Tanner says in his opinion book publishers are still going to be important in the market — not only do they provide editorial support to authors, but they just have stronger knowledge and existing links with distribution platforms, which can make the critical difference for a book.

    He points out Genova only went so far with her book when it was self-published — it took a major publisher to take her the rest of the way. “Yes, you can work with Google and other places online to sell books online if you are an author,” he says. “But I think publishers bring a lot more than an ability to bring books into Google.”

    Ultimately — and as has been previously chronicled — Australia’s eBook market is an evolving space, and Google is likely to take a place as one of a handful of large companies jockeying for market share and audience attention. And at the moment most of those companies — Amazon, for example, and Apple — have only tiny prescences locally when it comes to interacting with the publishing industry.

    The amount of local resources Google has thrown at eBooks isn’t huge either — but if Tanner’s passion is anything to go by, it may make a sizable splash. The executive says one of the “wonderful” things about his job is that he gets given free books whenever he visits publishers. Consequently, he’s got a big pile of about 35 to get through when he kicks off his summer break shortly.

    Only “five have been started”, he says. But that’s OK — a good book lasts forever.

    Image credit: miss_millions, Creative Commons, Google

    submit to reddit

    12 Comments

    You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

    1. Chad
      Posted 23/12/2010 at 5:06 pm | Permalink |

      As a Tolkien (there is a handful of us in Australia); Nice choice on the title image. \o/

    2. John Hansen
      Posted 23/12/2010 at 5:29 pm | Permalink |

      It is not true that all authors are ‘keen’ on digital. As an author of two bestseller books, I feel that the take-over of the publisher industry by large big box stores (Walmart, Kmart, Costco) and digital format is causing a great decline in the quality of writing, and less authors will be willing to spend time to write quality books and resort more to blogs and other formats. Quality publishing days are over with digital era.

      • Posted 23/12/2010 at 6:03 pm | Permalink |

        I agree, John, that not all authors are keen on digital. However, I strongly disagree with you that quality publishing days are over in the eBook era. Frankly, much of the problem with the publishing world has been that there are artificial barriers to entry in place that prevent many great books from reaching the public eye. There are so many bestselling authors (Ayn Rand being a notable one) who were knocked back by dozens of editors and publishers before their book went on to top the bestseller lists for years.

        The eBook platform removes many of those barriers — as the commoditisation of the printing press did before it. With more authors in play, the internet acts as a giant sifting mechanism, and the best content floats to the top gradually, and then exponentially.

        Eventually, we will have a much, much stronger publishing industry, with a lot of the crap weeded out, because of this. We’ve seen it in every other content production industry. Music, journalism, software applications and so on.

        • Posted 24/12/2010 at 5:45 am | Permalink |

          I agree with you, Renai. Digital platforms — ebooks and also sales-friendly POD services like Amazon’s CreateSpace — allow innovative writers like ours to write in ways that the industry before did not allow because of cost. We use color, embedded objects, music, video… And social networking creates a reader/buyer sphere that no longer requires typical modes of publicity like book reviews who have lost readers over the years because, in fact, they did not pay attention to what was happening in the small/indie press world.

          • Posted 24/12/2010 at 11:08 am | Permalink |

            Cheers for the comment Debra — although personally, I don’t believe I want colour, embedded objects, music and video in a book — at least, a novel for adults :) For other books (eg reference, children’s books), it would be fine. Plain text is what I want for novels though :)

            • Posted 24/12/2010 at 3:12 pm | Permalink |

              Recall that early publications ( novels for adults, lest I have to write “adult novels” oy!) always had illustrations, and that the very first novel, Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, was full of images that lent additional meaning to the text. The view that a novel should be only words is arbitrary and relatively recent. The artwork we commission is rarely illustrative, but rather fine artists idiosyncratically responding to the text, just as the musicians riff on it. P.S. The new POD model creates greater sustainability, as do ebooks. (see my recent interview at Art of Dismantling: http://theartofdismantling.blogspot.com/2010/12/intervew-with-debra-di-blasi-of-jaded.html

    3. Posted 24/12/2010 at 10:17 am | Permalink |

      I agree with John Hanson’s comment “Quality publishing days are over with digital era” besides picking up a book and getting away from technology is what reading a book is all about !

      • Posted 24/12/2010 at 11:07 am | Permalink |

        hi John,

        have you used an eReader — for example, the Kobo, the Kindle or even a Samsung Galaxy Tab or iPad? I can assure you, you will feel immersed in the book :)

    4. Posted 24/12/2010 at 1:34 pm | Permalink |

      “less authors will be willing to spend time to write quality books and resort more to blogs and other formats” – the numbers refute that statement; there were 700,000 MORE books published last year.

      “Frankly, much of the problem with the publishing world has been that there are artificial barriers to entry in place that prevent many great books from reaching the public eye.” – Yes, right on the mark.

    5. Posted 24/12/2010 at 3:18 pm | Permalink |

      The only thing that Amazon does not do is market your book, apart from the page design and recommend engine. If Google can use its search and social knowledge for book recommendation and promotion, then they have a killer app

    6. Posted 09/01/2011 at 9:28 pm | Permalink |

      I’ll be interested to see if Google can get past the apparent barriers to usable and comprehensive ebook access for Australians. So far, Borders isn’t working for me: I’m still having trouble using the reader app. (books don’t have text, or the pages won’t move on), the website is cumbersome, and the catalogue seems to be going backwards instead of forwards (many ebooks previously available there are now missing). More, I receive a weekly enewsletter offering me tantalizing discounts, which are only available at a Borders brick-and-mortar store: the closest one is 250km away.

      So, Google: all I want, as a keen reader very willing to buy way too many books, is access to the books I want, which I can then buy, download and read on my iPhone. I really can’t understand why that is unrealistic, just because I live in Australia.




    Get our 'Best of the Week' newsletter on Fridays

    Just the most important stories, one email a week.

    Email address:


  • Most Popular Content


  • Six smart secrets for nurturing customer relationships
    [ad] Today, we are experiencing a world where behind every app, every device, and every connection, is a customer. Your customers will demand you to be where they and managing customer relationship is the key to your business’s growth. The question is where do you start? Click here to download six free whitepapers to help you connect with your customers in a whole new way.
  • Enterprise IT stories

    • NetSuite in whole of business TurboSmart deal turbosmart

      Business-focused software as a service giant NetSuite has unveiled yet another win with a mid-sized Australian company, revealing a deal with automotive performance products manufacturer Turbosmart that has seen the company deploy a comprehensive suite of NetSuite products across its business.

    • WA Health told: Hire a goddamn CIO already doctor

      A state parliamentary committee has told Western Australia’s Department of Health to end four years of acting appointments and hire a permanent CIO, in the wake of news that the lack of such an executive role in the department contributed directly to the fiasco at the state’s new Fiona Stanley Hospital, much of which has revolved around poorly delivered IT systems.

    • Former whole of Qld Govt CIO Grant resigns petergrant

      High-flying IT executive Peter Grant has left his senior position in the Queensland State Government, a year after the state demoted him from the whole of government chief information officer role he had held for the second time.

    • Hills dumped $18m ERP/CRM rollout for Salesforce.com hills

      According to a blog post published by Salesforce.com today, one of Ted Pretty’s first moves upon taking up managing director role at iconic Australian brand Hills in 2012 was to halt an expensive traditional business software project and call Salesforce.com instead.

    • Dropbox opens Sydney office koalabox

      Cloud computing storage player Dropbox has announced it is opening an office in Sydney, as competition in the local enterprise cloud storage market accelerates.

    • Heartbleed, internal outages: CBA’s horror 24 hours commbankatm

      The Commonwealth Bank’s IT division has suffered something of a nightmare 24 hours, with a catastrophic internal IT outage taking down multiple systems and resulting in physical branches being offline, and the bank separately suffering public opprobrium stemming from contradictory statements it made with respect to potential vulnerabilities stemming from the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug.

    • Android in the enterprise: Three Aussie examples from Samsung androidapple

      Forget iOS and Windows. Today we present three decently sized deployments of Android in the Australian market on Samsung’s hardware, which the Korean vendor has dug up from its archives over the past several years for us after a little prompting :)

    • Businesslink cancelled Office 365 rollout cancelled

      Microsoft has been on a bit of a tear recently in Australia with its cloud-based Office 365 platform, signing up major customers such as the Queensland Government, Qantas, V8 Supercars and rental chain Mr Rental. And it’s not hard to see why, with the platform’s hybrid cloud/traditional deployment model giving customers substantial options. However, as iTNews reported last week, it hasn’t been all plain sailing for Redmond in this arena.

    • Qld Govt inks $26.5m deal for Office 365 walker

      The Queensland State Government yesterday announced it had signed a $26.5 million deal with Microsoft which will gain the state access to Microsoft’s Office 365 software and services platform. However, with the deal not covering operating system licences and not being mandatory for departments and agencies, it remains unclear what its impact will be.

    • Hospital IT booking system ‘putting lives at risk’ doctor

      A new IT booking platform at the Austin Hospital and Olivia Newton-John Cancer and Wellness Centre in Melbourne is reportedly placing the welfare of patients with serious conditions at risk.

  • Enterprise IT, News - Apr 17, 2014 16:39 - 0 Comments

    NetSuite in whole of business TurboSmart deal

    More In Enterprise IT


    News, Telecommunications - Apr 17, 2014 11:01 - 134 Comments

    Turnbull lies on NBN to Triple J listeners

    More In Telecommunications


    Featured, Industry, News - Apr 17, 2014 9:28 - 1 Comment

    Campaign Monitor takes US$250m from US VC

    More In Industry


    Digital Rights, News - Apr 17, 2014 12:41 - 14 Comments

    Anti-piracy lobbyist enjoys cozy email chats with AGD Secretary

    More In Digital Rights